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Recourse 1900
A Short Recourse

While the PRINTS IN PARIS exhibition showcases the Parisian prints under an archival format of sorts, we were invited to take an interest in learning more about the nature and context in which the prints functioned, then present our own readings of them in a contemporary light. Through Tuesday morning classes with our teacher Rene Put, we manoeuvred between discussing our experiments, and loosely-considered interpretations, sharing our formal analyses, and making time for everything else in-between. Our process was thus predominantly non-linear — hence, the outcomes (and the processes which led up to them, as outlined in the following pages) that are presented here are not ends in themselves, but manifestations uniting form and expression; very much still in a state of flux.

While we have attempted to cognise the ulterior nature in which these prints operated—this was partially addressed by exhibition designers Maarten Spruyt and Tsur Reshef for the PRINTS IN PARIS exhibition—we have mostly been involved with the literal aspects of the prints, functioning within the formal conditions of their appearance. One factor all of us felt predisposed to consider was the processes and materiality of printing—whether to operate within the contemporary separations between 'artistic' work (designing) and 'manual' work (printing), or to work against this dynamic?
       In any case, what binds this exhibition together is its pertinent reference to the collection and its many facets, extrapolated to reflect the present moment. As Regis Debray perfectly expressed in his seminal essay Print and Socialism:

"The greatest modernisers inaugurate their career with a backward leap, and a renaissance proceeds through a return to the past, a recycling, and hence a revolution.(...)The revolutionary act par excellence starts from a sense of nostalgia, the return to a forgotten text, a lost ideal."

While conceiving these posters, we have come to realise that we are only able to offer a partial representation amongst the many possibilities in responding to the Van Gogh Museum French print collection. In this regard, we ask that you, as the reader, view this simply as a contingent showcase of where we have come so far—a demonstration of working with a reflexive medium, ripe with possibilities.

Words by Cleo Tsw
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Recourse 1900
A Short Recourse

While the PRINTS IN PARIS exhibition showcases the Parisian prints under an archival format of sorts, we were invited to take an interest in learning more about the nature and context in which the prints functioned, then present our own readings of them in a contemporary light. Through Tuesday morning classes with our teacher Rene Put, we manoeuvred between discussing our experiments, and loosely-considered interpretations, sharing our formal analyses, and making time for everything else in-between. Our process was thus predominantly non-linear — hence, the outcomes (and the processes which led up to them, as outlined in the following pages) that are presented here are not ends in themselves, but manifestations uniting form and expression; very much still in a state of flux.

       While we have attempted to cognise the ulterior nature in which these prints operated—this was partially addressed by exhibition designers Maarten Spruyt and Tsur Reshef for the PRINTS IN PARIS exhibition—we have mostly been involved with the literal aspects of the prints, functioning within the formal conditions of their appearance. One factor all of us felt predisposed to consider was the processes and materiality of printing—whether to operate within the contemporary separations between 'artistic' work (designing) and 'manual' work (printing), or to work against this dynamic?
       In any case, what binds this exhibition together is its pertinent reference to the collection and its many facets, extrapolated to reflect the present moment. As Regis Debray perfectly expressed in his seminal essay Print and Socialism:

"The greatest modernisers inaugurate their career with a backward leap, and a renaissance proceeds through a return to the past, a recycling, and hence a revolution.(...)The revolutionary act par excellence starts from a sense of nostalgia, the return to a forgotten text, a lost ideal."

While conceiving these posters, we have come to realise that we are only able to offer a partial representation amongst the many possibilities in responding to the Van Gogh Museum French print collection. In this regard, we ask that you, as the reader, view this simply as a contingent showcase of where we have come so far—a demonstration of working with a reflexive medium, ripe with possibilities.

Words by Cleo Tsw
Preview Title Assigned by
a Selected Gerrit Rietveld Academie
b Specimen D'Affiche Artistique Van Gogh Museum
c Compiled Feelings Elisabeth Klement
d Dibi Däbi Papiershop Julia Born
e Recourse 1900 Van Gogh Museum
f Gerrit Workshop Hours Gerrit Rietveld Academie
g Chubby Lip Gloss Bart De Baets
h The Graphic Design Department Gerrit Rietveld Academie
h The Fashion Show 2019 Gerrit Rietveld Academie
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